Module 4- The Disruptive Force of Google Glass

Posted: July 20, 2016 in Ph.D., Uncategorized
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , ,

Google Glass and the MIT Sixth Sense project are the newest forms of wearable technology. It is similar to wearing a computer. They are both considered to be disruptive technologies. For this blog post, I am going to concentrate on Google Glass. I love the idea of Google Glass. I was one of the people who applied to get a pair. This was a must have for geeks everywhere. As we have seen since its inception, it has caused a disruption occurred in the market. Bilton (2015) explained that “From its unveiling in 2012, it was considered the Gadget, yearned after by everyone from nerds and chief executives to chefs and fashionistas. It was the must-have toy that was going to set the gold standard for a new class of wearable computers.” (Bilton, 2015 p.1) It was the truth everyone, and anyone wanted a pair of Google Glass. They became such a disruptive force. A disruption occurs when, “new technology with the same functionality of existing technology, but it functions more efficiently, and then obsoletes that technology.” (Laureate Education, 2014a).

There are many social benefits from Google Glass, but society has not yet reached a point where they have realized it. Once they re-launch and become as popular as a smartphone, no one will worry about how they look when wearing them. This wearable technology will keep you connected to the world around you, as well as the virtual world. Google Glass replaces so many current technologies. With Google Glass, there is no need for tablets, mobile phones, computers and so many other devices that we use today. It can replace all of them. If I were able to make calls, send text messages and browse the web all from a pair of glasses that I wear, I would have no need for a phone or tablet anymore. There is another social issue that will come with Google Glass. Hurst ( 2013) said, “The most significant Google Glass experience is not the user experience – it’s the experience of everyone else” (Hurst 2013 p.1). This is very true. For anyone who will be using Google Glass, especially while it is first coming out will be met with backlash. I had seen videos of the early adopters who got their hands on Glass before it was shut down shunned. Now, I feel this will change again when society realizes that this is a need much like a smartphone, but it is also something that should be considered. People who are not wearing Glass may not be too happy having a conversation or being around anyone who is. This happens with new technologies, but it is something to think about when going over the social benefits.

I believe that Google Glass is still an emerging technology and is not quite ready to be replaced. We are just starting to see a wave of Virtual Reality headsets come onto the market, but there are not many other companies openly experimenting with Augmentative Reality devices. The only other one I can think of that is similar to Google Glass is the Microsoft HoloLens (which is only currently available to developers). One of the reasons I feel it is not ready to be replaced is due to the fact the project was shut down after early adopters were able to use Google Glass. It has such bad reviews because it was not ready to be released. Bilton said, “Several people with knowledge of Mr. Fadell’s plans for Glass said he was going to redesign the product from scratch and would not release it until it was complete.” (Bilton, 2015 p.1) I think once a new version of Google Glass is released and people are using it then replacing it is wide open. As Dr. Thornburg states, “New technologies are always susceptible to unanticipated “wild card” disruptive technologies.” (Laureate Education, 2014a). It is entirely accurate. Once this technology emerges, we have no idea what might be in store for the future. This product will also always have updates until it is completely replaced by the next disruptive technology. I don’t feel that Google Glass will be going anywhere quickly once it is rereleased but there will be many improvements made over the course of its life.

 

Reference

 

Bilton, N. (2015, February 4). Why Google Glass Broke – The New York Times. Retrieved from http://www.nytimes.com/2015/02/05/style/why-google-glass-broke.html?_r=0

Hurst, M. (2013) The Google Glass feature no one is talking about. Retrieved from http://creativegood.com/blog/the-google-glass-feature-no-one-is-talking-about/

Laureate Education (Producer). (2014a). David Thornburg: Disruptive technologies [Video file]. Baltimore, MD: Author.

 

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Comments
  1. Monica Triplett says:

    Frances:

    Reading your blog makes me want Google Glass! Having the features of a phone and tablet in a pair of glasses will be unbelievably convenient; glasses are a perfect wearable technology. As someone who has worn glasses since early childhood, I know that they are unobtrusive. However, you raised a valid point about how Google Glass may be perceived by nonusers. If a person is using Google Glass is talking to someone who is not, it may be a little like wearing sunglasses while others have removed theirs- awkward. Just a kids are sometimes teased for wearing glasses, early adaptors of this Sixth Sense technology may be viewed negatively by those who don’t understand it or are jealous of it. Until Google Glass becomes mainstream, early adaptors may need to exercise caution when they wear their glasses.

    Monica

  2. 1docstu says:

    Reading your blog makes me want Google Glass! Having the features of a phone and tablet in a pair of glasses will be unbelievably convenient; glasses are a perfect wearable technology. As someone who has worn glasses since early childhood, I know that they are unobtrusive. However, you raised a valid point about how Google Glass may be perceived by nonusers. If a person is using Google Glass is talking to someone who is not, it may be a little like wearing sunglasses while others have removed theirs- awkward. Just a kids are sometimes teased for wearing glasses, early adaptors of this Sixth Sense technology may be viewed negatively by those who don’t understand it or are jealous of it. Until Google Glass becomes mainstream, early adaptors may need to exercise caution when they wear their glasses.
    Monica

  3. Diana Figueroa says:

    Hi Frances,

    Excellent report on the benefits and uses for Google Glasses. I think you did a great job describing the main advantage of the glasses are the numerous technology devices it replaces. Although, this technology seems pretty awesome in itself (mainly the hands free portion for me), I can honestly say I would be a late adopter. Even though I could get more out of wearing the technology, I almost feel uncomfortable wearing the technology. For example, if someone is wearing the glasses while the other person is not, and both are engaging in a conversation how can somebody know for sure if the person wearing the glasses is in fact “present” in the dialogue and not checking their emails, social media etc? Is wearing the glasses a barrier for future face to face communication? As we already know now all these new technologies have limited in person communication, I am wondering if the use of the glasses will only make matter’s more complicated? What are your thoughts?

    Diana

  4. Darren Hood says:

    Great post, Frances. I’ve always wanted to learn more about Google Glass and read some feedback about the product. I appreciate your input and am encouraged to do more research on the subject. One of the things I’m surprised about (when it comes to the feedback and responses to the product) involve what appears to be a lack of an iterative mindset about the product. I would hope and think that people would identify the plusses and minuses and look to improve upon what has been deployed.

    I look forward to the product’s “resurrection” in the near future, as I think the HoloLens and other VR-related products (e.g., Samsung Gear VR) serve somewhat different purposes.

  5. Dear Darren,

    Actually the hololens is supposed to be the direct competitor to google glaas. If you look up the hololens they are augmentative reality as well unlike the Samsung VR, Oculous Rift or the Playstation VR.

    I agree that I hope the perception changes for google glass. I plan on being an early adopter once they rerelease. Thank you for responding.

  6. I do not believe that this will complicate anything at all I actually think for people who open mind it won’t be a problem. My boyfriend and I have already talked to Dad and he would have no problem with me using it as I would have no problem with him using it the only thing I worry about some of the security like the fact that you might not be able to turn the video on and off but I might be recording all the time besides that I hope to adopt it hasn’t really got there as soon as it comes back on the market.

  7. I agree that early adopters must always proceed with caution but that’s the same thing with any brand new cell phone you get that expensive you’re always going to need to proceed with caution because there’s going to be somebody else that wants to take it. Would those types of devices costing nearly $2,000 of course you will need to excersize caution. I think once people see the functional use in them and the price becomes affordable people will try it and then adopt it. Thank you for responding.

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